Exploring patient profiles

Some patients may not need a Schedule II or III opioid: Meet a few who may benefit from the first and only co-crystal analgesic for acute pain

Back pain icon

Back pain

Knee injury icon

Knee injury

Ankle fracture icon

Postoperative
ankle fracture

Meet Richard Meet Richard

Richard, 55*

Widowed, enjoys gardening and reading mystery novels. In his free time, he meets with friends for a game of cards.

*Not an actual patient.

“I woke up one morning with pain in my lower back, and I wondered what I did differently while gardening. The pain was so intense that the high-dose acetaminophen my doctor recommended barely helped.”

Richard, 55*

Widowed, enjoys gardening and reading mystery novels. In his free time, he meets with friends for a game of cards.

*Not an actual patient.

“I woke up one morning with pain in my lower back, and I wondered what I did differently while gardening. The pain was so intense that the high-dose acetaminophen my doctor recommended barely helped.”

Patient history

  • No prior or recurring injuries
  • No prior history of opioid use or dependence
  • Smoker
  • Poor eating habits leading to recent weight gain (BMI28)
  • Previously advised to take acetaminophen (1000 mg Q6H) and apply a heat pack as needed

Current presentation

  • Acute pain in lower back (duration 3 days)
  • Pain worsens with movement
  • Restricted lumbar range of motion and segmental mobility
  • NPRS score: 6

BMI, body mass index; NPRS, Numeric Pain Rating Scale; Q6H, every 6 hours.

Meet Jamie Meet Jamie

Jamie, 46*

Loves outdoor sports, including rock climbing and water-skiing.

*Not an actual patient.

“I must have really banged up my knee rock climbing because ibuprofen 4 times a day doesn’t seem to be relieving the pain after several days.”

Jamie, 46*

Loves outdoor sports, including rock climbing and water-skiing.

*Not an actual patient.

“I must have really banged up my knee rock climbing because ibuprofen 4 times a day doesn’t seem to be relieving the pain after several days.”

Patient history

  • No prior or recurring injuries
  • No associated comorbidities
  • No prior history of opioid use or dependence
  • Drinks alcohol socially
  • Urgent care physician recommended high-dose ibuprofen (800 mg Q6H)

Current presentation

  • Pain in left knee resulting from an injury rock climbing
  • Notable tenderness and swelling in left knee
  • Limited mobility due to acute knee pain
  • NPRS score: 7

NPRS, Numeric Pain Rating Scale; Q6H, every 6 hours.

Meet Tiffany Meet Tiffany

Tiffany, 37*

Loves all things fitness, jogging, outdoor biking, hikes, and spin classes on her stationary bike.

*Not an actual patient.

“I hit a particularly rough patch of road when biking on a trail and had a hard tumble. I must have hurt my ankle pretty badly because I can’t put any weight on it whatsoever.”

Tiffany, 37*

Loves all things fitness, jogging, outdoor biking, hikes, and spin classes on her stationary bike.

*Not an actual patient.

“I hit a particularly rough patch of road when biking on a trail and had a hard tumble. I must have hurt my ankle pretty badly because I can’t put any weight on it whatsoever.”

Patient history

  • No prior or recurring injuries
  • No associated comorbidities
  • No prior history of opioid use or dependence
  • Bruising and swelling around ankle from an injury during a biking accident
  • Cannot bear weight on her right foot
  • Urgent care physician conducted an x-ray that showed an ankle fracture and recommended a referral to an orthopedic surgeon for further management

Current presentation

  • Postoperative swelling around ankle
  • Patient awaiting discharge from hospital
  • NPRS score after surgery: 8

NPRS, Numeric Pain Rating Scale.

Compared to tramadol hydrochloride, celecoxib, and placebo, SEGLENTIS demonstrated better efficacy over 48 hours in clinical trials†1

At maximum doses for acute pain, SEGLENTIS has the lowest morphine milligram equivalents (MME) per day than any other opioid analgesic1-6

SEGLENTIS showed statistically significantly better summed pain intensity difference over 48 hours (SPID48) than tramadol hydrochloride, celecoxib, and placebo.

References

  1. SEGLENTIS [prescribing information]. Montgomery, AL: Kowa Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.; October 2021.
  2. Ultram (tramadol hydrochloride) tablets [prescribing information]. Titusville, NJ: Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; September 2021.
  3. Opioid oral morphine milligram equivalent (MME) conversion factors. Utah Department of Health Medicaid. https:/‌/medicaid.utah.gov/Documents/files/Opioid-Morphine-EQ-Conversion-Factors.pdf. Accessed August 10, 2022.
  4. Oxycodone hydrochloride and acetaminophen tablet [prescribing information]. Paramus, NJ: Mayne Pharma Inc.; May 2021.
  5. Dowell D, Haegerich TM, Chou R. CDC guideline for prescribing opioids for chronic pain. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2016;65(1):1-49.
  6. Hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets [prescribing information]. Newtown, PA: KVK-Tech, Inc.; August 2020.